For more information:

Gary Bushell
Coalition Executive Director
512-478-6661
gebushell@aol.com

John Thompson
Coalition Chairman

Former County Judge,
Polk County, TX
EMAIL

Duane Peters
Coalition Vice-Chairman

Brazos County Judge
Bryan/College Station, TX

COALITION UPDATES

Feb. 2017 - Momentum Building for New Interstate 14 in Texas. Report on GCSHC 2017 Annual Meeting. (Download Media Release)

Jan. 2017 - US 190 in Bell County added to Interstate Highway System. New signs will go up soon. (Read More)

April 2016 - State Advances Designation of First Section of Interstate 14 (Read More)

Jan. 2016 - TxDOT Will Advance Planning For Gulf Coast Strategic Highway System Including Interstate 14 (Read More)

2016 ANNUAL MEETING PHOTO GALLERY

Jan. 21, 2016 - Killeen Daily Herald: "Forts to Ports" Highway Discussed in Bryan (Read More)

Dec. 8, 2015 - Congress Designates Central Texas Corridor as Future Interstate 14. Texas congressional delegation amendment part of FAST Act of 2015.
(Read More)

 

 

 

Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition Inc.
800 West 38th Street, Suite 9305
Austin, Texas 78705

Don Rodman
Communications
(361) 877-0409
don@therodmanco.com

Momentum Building for New Interstate 14

February 8, 2017

AUSTIN, TEXAS – While development of Interstate 14 across Texas will take decades, momentum for improvement projects in the corridor is building and has support from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

Representatives of two dozen communities that make up the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition gathered in Austin this week to hear about current and future highway transportation needs including the fact that improved highways add military value to bases in Texas and Louisiana.

The first 25-mile segment of US 190 is now part of the Interstate Highway System.  It runs from Interstate 35 in Belton to Copperas Cove and provides direct access to the main gate at Fort Hood in Killeen.  A celebration is being planned in the coming months to unveil the first I-14 signs.

For more than a decade the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition has been advocating for improved highway connections between U.S. Army facilities at Fort Hood, Fort Bliss and Fort Polk and the strategic military deployment ports at Beaumont and Corpus Christi.  Such improvements increase the military value of those installations as they perform their assigned mission.

“Since the Interstate Highway System was designated initially as a defense highway system, it only makes sense that with a military installation like Fort Hood we would want to make sure that it is tied and connected directly to our interstate system,” TxDOT Deputy Executive Director Marc Williams told the group during the Coalition’s annual meeting.

In 2015 the Congress created the Central Texas Corridor generally along the US 190 route and designated it as future I-14.  The Coalition and members of Congress are currently supporting additional legislation to adjust the corridor in West Texas so that it will serve San Angelo and Midland-Odessa.

Williams noted that it took only a year to go from congressional action to final decision on the first segment of I-14.  He warned that it is going to take a long time and concerted effort to continue the progress.  “The important thing is that you all have some momentum, you are organized, you are promoting the importance of that corridor, and TxDOT wants to do our part as well.  We are working within our Transportation Planning and Programming Division to understand and begin to look at the feasibility of incremental improvements to that corridor,” Williams said.

He noted that the Texas Transportation Commission includes members who are strong supporters of highway projects that provide connectivity between regions and centers of commerce and production.  He said Commission Chairman Tryon Lewis of Odessa certainly appreciates the significance of making investments to ensure that all of Texas is connected to key transportation corridors. 

In a video message sent to the group, Congressman Brian Babin of East Texas said he believes I-14 can be an example to the nation of Congress getting something right when it comes to transportation.  Congressman Babin is a member of the U.S. House Transportation Committee and was the House sponsor of the I-14 designation language.  Senator John Cornyn sponsored the effort in the U.S. Senate.

Speakers during the annual meeting stressed the need for improved connectivity, particularly between the key Permian Basin oil and gas production region and seaports on the Texas Coast.

That included James Beauchamp, president of the Midland-Odessa Transportation Alliance, who explained that the Permian Basin is responsible for more than 50% of the oil produced in Texas and that the Texas Railroad Commission estimates there are roughly 500 years of recoverable oil and gas resources in the region.

“Our region is growing but we are isolated.  That is why these highway connections are so important to us,” he said.  He pointed to the value of improved highway connections between the Permian Basin and the frac sand mines in McCulloch County and the oil refineries and export terminals at the Port of Corpus Christi.

Roland Pena, economic development director for the City of San Angelo, also pointed to long-term energy development in West Texas and the importance of transportation in serving energy industry growth. 

The Coalition also heard updates on transportation needs from Charlie Zahn, chairman of the Port of Corpus Christi Authority, Clayton Henderson of the Port of Beaumont, Major Gen. Kendall Cox who heads the Heart of Texas Defense Alliance, Malcolm Morris who represents communities supporting Fort Polk in Louisiana, McCulloch County Judge Danny Neal who talked about the expansion of frac sand mines in his county and Jasper County Judge Mark Allen who talked about the need for improvements in East Texas.

John Thompson, former county judge of Polk County and board chairman of the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition, said these updates helped Coalition members better understand how improvements to the I-14 Corridor and its connector spurs will help Texas take advantage of energy industry growth and provide new economic development opportunities across a wide area of the state.

The Central Texas Corridor begins in West Texas and runs through Killeen, Bryan/College Station, Huntsville, Livingston, the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe Reservation, Woodville and Jasper before crossing into Louisiana at the Sabine River near Fort Polk.  Thompson said upgrading this corridor to interstate standard will mean improved safety and traffic mobility while creating new growth opportunities for the communities in the regions served by the future interstate highway.

A Strategic Transportation System Linking Military Facilities to Deployment Seaports

The Gulf Coast Strategic Highway System is being pursued to meet the military transportation needs of U.S. Army facilities in Texas and Louisiana and connect them with Strategic Deployment seaports -- the Port of Corpus Christi and the Port of Beaumont. That includes Fort Hood, Fort Polk and Fort Bliss.

The Gulf Coast Strategic Highway System including future Interstate 14 will help meet the need to move a growing amount of freight from one region to another and provide improved safety for travelers moving in and out of Central Texas, West Texas and Louisiana. This upgraded highway infrastructure will provide economic development opportunities in portions of Texas and Louisiana, some of which have not kept up with the economic growth occurring elsewhere. The U.S. Congress officially identified the Central Texas Corridor as a high priority corridor in federal highway legislation passed in 2015 and specified that it will be Interstate Highway 14 in the future.

The Central Texas Corridor approved by Congress in the FAST Act includes State Highway 63 from the Sabine River to Jasper, Texas, and US 190 westward to Huntsville, Bryan/College Station, Temple, Killeen and Brady. The designation also includes the section of US 190 from Brady to a connection with Interstate 10 in Pecos County. Members of Congress and the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition now think a better route for future I-14 in West Texas will instead have the corridor run west from Brady through San Angelo on US 87 and then to Interstate 20 at Midland and Odessa, benefiting those existing population and commercial centers and overall east-west traffic flow in Texas. A spur route would run from Eden south following US 83 to connect with Interstate 10 at Junction in Kimble County. An amendment is being sought that would make these revisions to the I-14 Central Texas Corridor designation.

Congressional approval is also being sought for an I-14 corridor component that would run across Central Louisiana from the Sabine River to the Mississippi River. The route would generally follow LA 8 and LA 28 eastward to Leesville and Fort Polk and then run to Interstate 49 at Alexandria and Pineville. The proposed designation would then go east on LA 28 to Archie and then on US 84 to the river bridge connecting Vidalia, La., and Natchez, Mississippi.

The proposed revisions are depicted in this graphic showing the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway System. Click to enlarge.

(Download Graphic PDF)

Central Texas Freeway Now Interstate 14;TxDOT Commission Gives Final Approval

January 27, 2017

AUSTIN, TEXAS – The Texas Transportation Commission voted Thursday to give final approval to designation of 25 miles of US 190 freeway in Bell County as Interstate 14.

The freeway segment is now part of the Interstate Highway System and Interstate 14 signs will go up in the coming months on the section stretching west from Interstate 35 in Belton to the eastern edge of Copperas Cove. 

The Texas Department of Transportation’s Waco District spent the past year working with the Federal Highway Administration to review elements of the existing highway to confirm they meet required interstate highway design standards.  Highway upgrades of this segment have been underway for the past few years and more expansion projects are planned.

Leading up to the final decision, the I-14 designation was previously approved by the Killeen-Temple Metropolitan Planning Organization, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, and the Federal Highway Administration.

John Thompson, former county judge of Polk County and board chairman of the Gulf Coast Strategic Highway Coalition, had high praise for the Transportation Commission’s swift action in making the first section of Interstate 14 a reality.  He noted it took only a year to reach that milestone following the congressional designation of the Central Texas Corridor as future I-14 as part of the FAST Act in December 2015. 

I-14/US 190 serves as the primary access to Fort Hood at Killeen, home of 36,000 military personnel and 50,000 family members.  Fort Hood is the largest single site employer in Texas.

John Crutchfield, president of the Killeen Chamber of Commerce, said I-14 is more than a highway project, it is a way for the state to support one of the most important military facilities in the nation.

Major General Ken Cox USA (ret), president of the Heart of Texas Defense Alliance, noted that the 25-mile highway segment was recently used by the Army to deploy Army units to Europe.

The Central Texas Corridor begins in West Texas and runs through Killeen, Bryan/College Station, Huntsville, Livingston, Woodville and Jasper before crossing into Louisiana at the Sabine River near Fort Polk.  Thompson said upgrading this corridor to interstate standard will mean improved safety and traffic mobility while creating new economic development opportunities for the communities in the regions served by the interstate highway.